The Active Play A.T.H.L.E.T.E.

The forth and final in the series: The Athlete and the Injury . . .

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Active Play Athlete

Here are some guidelines for the Active Play Athlete:

Accommodate your body

You are already doing this by participating in a variety of activities! This is what our bodies crave and what limits our injury risk

Continue this habit!

Take time to  . . . do what you dislike 🙂

There is something you don’t like to do ~ admit it! And then do it anyway!

Even though your performance is already a mixture of sports and activities you still need to strengthen, stretch and get in some cardio work to decrease your risk of injury.

Have goals

Is there a fitness goal you are working toward? If not make one. This will keep you motivated and engaged in your physical health.

Lift Weights

So many people forget to do strength training – you don’t need dumbbells or machinery, you can simply use your body weight.

Girls between the ages of 12-25 can lose bone mass and set themselves up for osteoporosis later in life if they are not getting stronger in their teens!

Environment will enhance your athleticism

If you prefer one type of activity over another then vary the environment in which you perform it! If you like  to hike or bike then do it in the mountains, the beach, trails and asphalt. The varying terrains will force your muscles to work differently reducing your overall risk of injury.

Take a class

Classes can offer flexibility, strengthening, cardio, agility all in one hour or less!

Sometimes it is easier to be motivated when you are with your friends!

Also, since variety is your spice of life you can take a different class each day and stay a well rounded athlete!

Exercise your judgement

If your body is telling you something isn’t right, listen to it. Sometimes the “No Pain No Gain” adage is not correct! (sometimes it is!)

Take rest/recovery days

Eat right to fuel your body for the activity you do

If you have an injury, or are not sure how to round out your routine . . . see a PT, the human movement specialist, who can provide you will information to make educated decisions.

So there you have it . . .  tips for all types of athletes . . .Have you decided who you are? How about your child?

Leave a comment and tell me how you are going to prevent injury now that you know?

No matter the type of athlete you are, risk of injury is part of living. Use the tips above to mitigate your risk and see your PT for more help!

Be Well, Roxi

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